Welcome to the SEAL Community!

Social and emotional learning helps children and young people to:

‘… learn how to communicate their feelings, set themselves goals and work towards them, interact successfully with others, resolve conflicts peaceably, control their anger and negotiate their way through the many complex relationships in their lives today and tomorrow’.

This kind of learning underpins positive behaviour and attitudes to learning, personal development and mental health and wellbeing. It is at the heart of PSHE, relationships and health education.

Research shows it also helps raise attainment. Social and emotional learning is attracting increasing attention in schools. On this website you will find age-related teaching resources and whole school frameworks to support your work.

Many of them come from the national ‘Social and emotional Learning’ (SEAL) initiative. By registering with us (which is free, quick and easy), you can immediately find and download all of the national SEAL curriculum materials and teacher guidance. There’s a progression in learning objectives that can be used in any school, and training materials if you want to introduce or refresh a whole-school SEAL approach. Click on National Resources  then click the Getting Started with SEAL tab.

If you would like regularly updated teaching resources, you can also join our SEAL Community. Set up and supported by leading experts in the field, the SEAL Community is a not-for-profit organisation which aims to promote and develop SEAL through sharing news, practice, resources and expertise. Joining costs £30 for individuals, £75 for schools/settings and £100 for local authorities or other multi-school organisations. Click the Join button on this page to join.

News update

One in six young people in England — or five in each secondary classroom — had a probable mental disorder, a rate that has held steady since last year but which is up from one in nine in 2017...

The Children’s Society’s Good Childhood report - an annual review of young people’s wellbeing - finds that seven per cent of 10- to 15-year-olds are not happy with their lives overall ...

DfE in England have published updated information to let senior mental health leads know how they can book and apply for a training grant...

New whole-school wellbeing guidance for English schools published by DfE and Public Health England.

The study, launched in summer 2020, is one of the few that repeatedly asks younger teenagers about their experiences of the pandemic...

Sharing practice

Nottingham City’s Better Start project funded a community arts organisation to create a piece of puppet theatre – The Search for Teddy’s Island – that could be performed on a family’s doorstep...

Have a look at this inspiring short film about how older students in a US secondary school set up a We Dine Together club to make sure no student has to eat their lunch alone. Maybe show it to Y11s/12s/13s to see if it gives them ideas? ...

Laura Fletcher at Wexham Court Primary School describes how she helped a group of boys learn the skills they need to resolve playground conflicts...

When Woodbrook Vale secondary school decided to prioritise pupils’ personal development, their biggest challenges were how to motivate students to engage with an area they wouldn’t get a grade in...

Try this with your new primary class., to create a sense of belonging...

Resource roundup

DiGii Social is a new and exciting way to teach digital safeguarding and Relationships Education to upper primary children.

We have trawled the very best of the website for the most useful lessons, assemblies and videos on relationships.

For work on Good to be Me/Learning about me have you seen the PiXL free resources based on Matthew Syed’s funny and engaging book ‘Dare to be You’...

We’ve new ideas for your work on helping children value themselves, manage worries and look after their wellbeing

Practical tools

Brian Bilston’s poem ‘Refugees’ begins:...

There are some nice ideas here for early years emotional check-ins…

Spray or hand paint a pathway onto the playground surface (or in a corner of the school hall), with footprint markings where each child can place their feet. Then ...

Use paint charts for work on understanding and using words that describe different intensities of emotions. Children can match words like ...

More and more schools are using emotion check-ins at the start of the day or lessons- using emojis, thumbs up/down/sideways, rating scales, self-re

New research

In a world of (sometimes) selfish adults, it is nice to know that very young children can be generous to others in need...

Families Connect is a programme developed by Save the Children UK to help parents support their children’s learning in the home...

In this non-experimental study researchers analysed data on 740 children who took up one-to-one counselling...

The Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues have published a report on a sample of Ofsted inspections in Birmingham and London schools.

They found that inspectors focused more on perseverance, resilience and grit than other social and emotional capabilities.

Find out more at https://www.jubileecentre.ac.uk/media/news/article/6784/New-Insight-Series-Paper-Character-and-Ofsted-


 

The Early Intervention Foundation applies rigorous standards to rate different programmes according to the strength of research evidence behind them. The latest to get a strong rating is the .b school based mindfulness programme.  

Watch this nice film about the programme here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8UhpgtSzvg&feature=emb_logo

Top resource


We all want children to enjoy playtimes, benefiting from the physical and mental exercise and social interaction that effectively-run outdoor spaces allow. This book has been written to help you or your children teach exciting games that will encourage children's social and emotional development.

This new resource is invaluable in my reception class – there are stories for every occasion which really engage the children and they love the pictures! It’s a great SEAL resource for practitioners and so easy as it’s ready to use and full of brilliant ideas for follow up activities. I can’t recommend it highly enough!

Louise Scruton-Evans, Reception Teacher, Bristol.