Welcome to the SEAL Community!

Social and emotional learning helps children and young people to:

‘… learn how to communicate their feelings, set themselves goals and work towards them, interact successfully with others, resolve conflicts peaceably, control their anger and negotiate their way through the many complex relationships in their lives today and tomorrow’.

This kind of learning underpins positive behaviour and attitudes to learning, personal development and mental health and wellbeing. It is at the heart of PSHE, relationships and health education.

Research shows it also helps raise attainment. Social and emotional learning is attracting increasing attention in schools. On this website you will find age-related teaching resources and whole school frameworks to support your work.

Many of them come from the national ‘Social and emotional Learning’ (SEAL) initiative. By registering with us (which is free, quick and easy), you can immediately find and download all of the national SEAL curriculum materials and teacher guidance. There’s a progression in learning objectives that can be used in any school, and training materials if you want to introduce or refresh a whole-school SEAL approach. Click on National Resources  then click the Getting Started with SEAL tab.

If you would like regularly updated teaching resources, you can also join our SEAL Community. Set up and supported by leading experts in the field, the SEAL Community is a not-for-profit organisation which aims to promote and develop SEAL through sharing news, practice, resources and expertise. Joining costs £30 for individuals, £75 for schools/settings and £100 for local authorities or other multi-school organisations. Click the Join button on this page to join.

News update

For those of you who remember the original primary SEAL pink box of hard-copy booklets of all the SEAL curriculum resources… we have been gifted six of these boxes.We’d like them to go to the first six schools ...

We liked this series of short, animated videos for teenagers - created in collaboration with animation studio Aardman, they are clever and funny. They cover topics like feeling lonely, perfectionism, competitiveness and social media...

This animation and accompanying teacher toolkit from the Anna Freud Centre is aimed at secondary school pupils (Years 7-9)...

We’ve just discovered BBC’s I-Player Lifebabble collection.There are films about friends and relationships, feeling good, bullying, friendships, surviving in a new school, dealing with fear - and great quizzes ....

This is a nice short film about how to teach students to categorise their problems as big or small, help each other with problems, and resolve disagreements and conflicts. Find it ...

Sharing practice

When Woodbrook Vale secondary school decided to prioritise pupils’ personal development, their biggest challenges were how to motivate students to engage with an area they wouldn’t get a grade in...

Try this with your new primary class., to create a sense of belonging...

At Billesley Primary in Birmingham staff noticed that after the school closures children were struggling to interact with each other in class...

Miss Greenwood at Boothroyd Primary Academy uses the Colour Monster story and Measure My Mood feeling cards with her early years class, to explore how feelings can escalate...

Adrian Bethune of Teachappy has described fantastic work on kindness at John Stainer primary school in London. Kindness is a super-power, children were told.

Resource roundup

We’ve just discovered BBC’s I-Player Lifebabble collection.There are films about friends and relationships, feeling good, bullying, friendships, surviving in a new school, dealing with fear - and great quizzes ....

This is a nice short film about how to teach students to categorise their problems as big or small, help each other with problems, and resolve disagreements and conflicts. Find it ...

These KS4 lessons from the British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) help students think about emotional wellbeing and film, TV and other video content. They include ...

Here's a really useful booklist on making friends, from the National Literacy Trust– ages up to twelve ....

Here's some nice text from Public Health England to share with parents/carers when you are working on wellbeing in school ...

Practical tools

Julie from The SEAL Community has done an incredibly boring but incredibly useful job of mapping SEAL against the new curriculum...

Try this nice empathy mirror exercise from Empathy Lab in class...

Teacher Elena Aguard describes how on the first day of school she gives students a survey...

Tell your class this…

Change the way we ask questions, so as to foster a supportive classroom climate...

New research

Families Connect is a programme developed by Save the Children UK to help parents support their children’s learning in the home...

In this non-experimental study researchers analysed data on 740 children who took up one-to-one counselling...

The Jubilee Centre for Character and Virtues have published a report on a sample of Ofsted inspections in Birmingham and London schools.

They found that inspectors focused more on perseverance, resilience and grit than other social and emotional capabilities.

Find out more at https://www.jubileecentre.ac.uk/media/news/article/6784/New-Insight-Series-Paper-Character-and-Ofsted-


 

The Early Intervention Foundation applies rigorous standards to rate different programmes according to the strength of research evidence behind them. The latest to get a strong rating is the .b school based mindfulness programme.  

Watch this nice film about the programme here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8UhpgtSzvg&feature=emb_logo

A  new study shows that schools which promote relationships, resilience and belonging have a bigger impact on the long-term success of pupils from disadvantaged or minority ethnic backgrounds than those which just raise attainment test scores.

Top resource

Expandaball
This expanding ball is great for teaching mindful breathing...

We really like this programme to teach young people aged 8 – 16 years to manage their own anxiety and worry. It helps them develop techniques to use on their own when they begin to feel worried; these are printed onto a fan to keep in their pocket or bag.